Jeanine O'Loughlin

Fantasy, Science Fiction & Historical Fiction Author, Blogger, and Geek

Category: National Pride Month

Pride Month – Tennessee Williams & The Glass Menagerie

June is LGBT Pride Month so let’s take some time to appreciate authors of the community and their great works.

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Tennessee Williams 3/26/11 – 2/25/83

An American playwright and author best known for his works The Glass Menagerie, A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Orpheus Descending and Sweet Bird of Youth. Many of his pieces were adapted to film and in 1979 he was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.

The Glass Menagerie premiered in Chicago in 1944 and reached critical fame that eventually launched the play onto Broadway where it won New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1945. The play centers around Tom Wingfield’s memory of his mother Amanda and his sister Laura who suffered from a limp caused by a bout of polio. With a small cast and an interesting, and a twist at the end of the play makes for a play that many say reflected his own unhappy background. The play would later become a film in 1950; directed by Irving Rapper and staring Gertrude Lawrence, Jane Wyman, Kirk Douglas, and Arthur Kennedy as protagonist Tom Wingfield to mixed reviews.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_Williams

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Glass_Menagerie

*Please note that for the sake of my sanity and in support of everyone’s right to be themselves I have disabled comments on these posts.

Pride Month – Oscar Wilde & The Importance of Being Earnest

June is LGBT Pride Month so let’s take some time to appreciate authors of the community and their great works.

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Oscar Wilde 10/16/1854 – 11/30/1900

An Irish author, playwright and poet of the Victorian era. He is best known for his play The Importance of Being Earnest and his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. Oscar Wilde was fluent in both French and German in addition to his native English. When Wilde moved to London he was welcomed into fashionable cultural & social circles of the time and became one of the best known personalities of Britain’s elite well before his written works received notice. Many of his works were considered offensive to Victorian era morality, and many would say that Wilde was simply a man ahead of his time, which ultimately led to his incarceration and some would say his death.

Wilde’s novel The Picture of Dorian Gray was published in 1890 in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine as a complete story, but later published as it’s own novel in 1891. In the magazine publication the editors felt that the story was “indecent” and without the author’s knowledge removed five hundred words before publication. However, even with the censorship the story still offended the moral sensibilities of British book reviews of the time.

The Importance of Being Earnest was first performed on Valentine’s Day of 1895 in London’s St James’ s Theatre. It’s a satirical comedy in which the protagonists maintain fake personae to escape social obligations of the time. it was criticized for not containing a social message, but was considered one of the greatest comedies of the time. Many say that this play was the climax of Wilde’s career but was also the start of his sad persecution for his sexuality.

In 1985 while The Importance of Being Earnest was still performing in London Wilde had the Marquess of Queensberry prosecuted for libel. The Marquess was the father of Wilde’s lover, Lord Alfred Douglas. However, the trial unearthed evidence of his relationship with Lord Douglas and eventually led to his own arrest and trial for “gross indecency with other men.” He was convicted and imprisoned for two years’ hard labour. Wilde continued to write while in prison, but his works never again reached the fame that he had once achieved. Upon his release in 1897 he traveled to France where he remained, never to return to his home of Ireland or Britain. Wilde died destitute in Paris at the age of 46 in 1900 of cerebral meningitis. Wilde’s tomb currently resides at Pere Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. In 2011 the tomb had to be cleaned of the lipstick marks left by so many admirers, and a glass barrier was installed to prevent further marks of damage.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_Wilde

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Picture_of_Dorian_Gray

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Importance_of_Being_Earnest

*Please note that for the sake of my sanity and in support of everyone’s right to be themselves I have disabled comments on these posts.

Pride Month – Maurice Sendak & Where the Wild Things Are

June is LGBT Pride Month so let’s take some time to appreciate authors of the community and their great works.

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Maurice Sendak – 6/10/28 – 5/8/12

An American illustrator and writer of children’s books. He’s best known for Where the Wild Things Are published in 1963. Sendak grew up in New York City and after seeing the film Fantasia at the age of twelve sought a career as an illustrator. Where the Wild Things Are is about a young boy named Max who gets angry at his mother for sending him to bed without supper and seeks out friendship amongst some wild and some would say scary creatures. The book brought Sendak international attention and is now one of the most popular children’s books and was made into an animated short in 1973 and a major motion picture in 2009 to generally positive reviews and reception. In this reader’s opinion the book which was once criticized for depicting frightening creatures within a children’s picture book was not frightening to me and taught me not to fear what is on the outside, but on the inside of a person/creature.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Sendak

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Where_the_Wild_Things_Are

*Please note that for the sake of my sanity and in support of everyone’s right to be themselves I have disabled comments on these posts.

Pride Month – Gregory Maguire

June is LGBT Pride Month so let’s take some time to appreciate authors of the community and their great works.

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Gregory Maguire – 6/9/54 – Present

An American author born in Albany New York and best known for his novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West published in 1995. Maguire specializes in writing retellings of classic children’s stories including Wicked. Wicked tells the story of the Wicked Witch of the West from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum’s 1900 novel. In Wicked the Witch becomes the protagonist by the name of Elphaba and how her life lead her down the road and to the events in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

In 2003 the novel was adapted into a Broadway musical which was nominated for ten Tony Awards & won three. Having both read the book and seen the musical I feel it’s good to mention that the book and the musical are not the same story. Maguire’s story is dark and gritty describing a difficult childhood that drove Elphaba to the actions described in the original story. The musical takes a very Disney/Broadway perspective and shows Elphaba as just a misunderstood young woman standing up for what she believes in. They are both great stories, but vastly different in theme, tone, and events. If you were expecting something light-hearted like the musical you will be shocked into finding something completely different.9

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregory_Maguire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicked_(Maguire_novel)

*Please note that for the sake of my sanity and in support of everyone’s right to be themselves I have disabled comments on these posts.

Pride Month – Truman Capote & Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Sorry for the late posts this week. I have started a new job and was delayed in getting this written up.

Thanks for your patience!

June is LGBT Pride Month so let’s take some time to appreciate authors of the community and their great works.

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Truman Capote – 9/30/1924 – 8/25/1984

The American author best known for his novella that inspired the classic movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The novella was published in 1958 and adapted to the film we all love in 1961. The book originally was set in the 1940s but the movie was moved to the 1960s and the movie portrayed a different ending, but I won’t spoil that for you. It’s said that Capote originally envisioned Marilyn Monroe in the role of Holly but her contract with Twentieth Century Fox and schedule prevented her from being able to do the film. I think many of us would agree that Audrey Hepburn’s portrayal was fantastic and couldn’t imagine Holly in any other way.

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truman_Capote

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast_at_Tiffany%27s_(novella)

*Please note that for the sake of my sanity and in support of everyone’s right to be themselves I have disabled comments on these posts.

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